Friday, January 6, 2017

Our Health Magazine Bedside Manner Awards 2016

We would like to let you know that

Steve Strosnider got 2nd place!

Emily Defrance and Jackie Wilkerson got Honorable Mention!

Thank you to all of you that provide the feedback and we would like to encourage all of you to continue to give feedback!

Happy 2017!

Monday, December 19, 2016

The New Year



“If I continue to think as I have always thought, I will continue to act as I have always acted. If I continue to act as I have always acted, I will continue to get what I have always gotten. Change the thought, changes the behavior and leads to new results”
– Robert Ellis

With the New Year, we often reflect on the past year, set goals and look for ways to make change in the new year. We often make “resolutions” that range from focusing on family, changes in our health, work, how we manage stress, and family and friends.

Reflecting on our past and setting goals is healthy, the desire to change is healthy, and the desire to want better is healthy. When setting these goals or “resolutions” it can be easy to make some lofty or unrealistic ones, however that often will lead to frustration, disappointment and anger in ourselves.

It is important to remember that life is a journey, some days will be a sprint, but most of the time, life is a journey that takes time, thought and being active. Change will take time, it will take effort, and being mindful. If you want different results then you need to change the effort.

How to make your goals or changes stick?
1.Write down your goals. Studies have found that if you write down a goal, you are much more likely to achieve it. In addition, tell as many people as possible about your goals. When you share your goals with others, you are more likely to fulfill them.

2. Establish priorities. If you could only do three activities for the rest of your life, what would they be? Start paring down the activities that are bringing you down. Take a hard look at where you spend your time. Are you getting a return on your investment of your time, money, and energy? Or are you reaching a dead end? We outgrow activities and even people as we have more life experiences. It's not good or bad, it just is. If you are having a difficult time saying "no" to people or activities that no longer serve a purpose for you, see #1 on this list.

3.Make the goal specific
The more specific your goal is, the easier it is to make sure you’re making progress. Instead of “I want to work out more” try “I will run or boke every day for 30 minutes.” Makes it easier to execute and measure.

4. Prepare in Advance. Do not pick your goal the day you want to start or the day before. Spend time in advance picking and thinking about your goal. Research your goal and make a plan.

5. Make an Action Plan. This step is often missed in the process of goal setting. You get so focused on the outcome that you forget to plan all of the steps that are needed along the way. By writing out the individual steps, and then crossing each one off as you complete it, you'll realize that you are making progress towards your ultimate goal.

6. Stick With It! Remember, goal setting is an ongoing activity not just a means to an end. Build in reminders to keep yourself on track, and make regular time-slots available to review your goals. Your end destination may remain quite similar over the long term, but the action plan you set for yourself along the way can change significantly. Make sure the relevance, value, and necessity remain high.

7. Set a date. One of the best ways to knock out a goal is to put it on your calendar. If you put a stake in the ground and impose a date on yourself, you’re much more likely to reach it.

Change can happen. Goals can be achieved. It does not have to be difficult or overwhelming. Focus on your goals and changes one day at time. Be mindful and present. Be engaged in your life and in your goals. You can do it! Celebrate your successes and do not dwell on what you do not succeed at for that day. Tomorrow is a new day!








Monday, November 28, 2016

Holiday Season is upon us

Does the holiday season bring you stress? anxiety? depression? frustration? You are not alone!!!!

It seems as if the holiday season—that time-honored mixed bag of pleasure and pain—starts earlier and earlier each year, bringing with it a flood of emotional baggage many of us would prefer to leave behind. If you harbor memories of Thanksgiving, Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanza, or other holiday celebrations filled with disappointments and dread, you are not alone. This year holiday related items were up before Halloween!!!

If you experience excessive anxiety and foreboding at the first sight of holiday paraphernalia in the department store:

1. Consider relaxing your expectations
2. Shifting your mindset
3. Engage in relaxing and mindful exercises
4. Write a list of what you are thankful or have gratitude for and refer to that list often
5. Give the gift of love, time and your listening skills, make others feel important
6. Focus on giving to others rather than focusing on receiving


These changes help make it possible to survive—and even thrive—during the stress-filled weeks from late November until early January.

“Everybody can be great...because anybody can serve. You don't have to have a college degree to serve. You don't have to make your subject and verb agree to serve. You only need a heart full of grace. A soul generated by love.” ― Martin Luther King, Jr.


Here are a few list of ways to be grateful during the season

http://wanderlust.com/journal/100-ways-to-be-grateful-during-the-holidays/
http://www.briantracy.com/blog/business-success/attitude-of-gratitude-holiday-season-self-esteem/

Wednesday, October 26, 2016

Out of The Darkness

September 2016 was also known as National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month which helps promote resources and awareness around the issues of suicide prevention, how you can help others and how to talk about suicide without increasing the risk of harm.

To help promote awareness about Suicide and Prevention, there are ways one can get involved. Out of Darkness Walk Events is one way. A few weeks ago some of the PHR clinicans participated in a local Out of the Darkness walk.

Linda Snead stated, "Considering the weather, we had a favorable turnout. With all the glass, this facility provided the sense of outdoors, but we were dry. All the speakers were passionate regarding the mission of this event, to encourage people out of darkness & hopefully away from suicide Much appreciation to Nancy & Katlin for their time & expertise to represent PHR at our information table." Quite a few clinicians also donated to the cause.


Suicidal thoughts can affect anyone regardless of age, gender or background. Suicide is the third leading cause of death among young people and is often the result of mental health conditions that effect people when they are most vulnerable. Suicidal thoughts and suicide occur too frequently but should not be considered common and can indicate more serious issues.

Know The Warning Signs

Threats or comments about killing themselves, also known as suicidal ideation, can begin with seemingly harmless thoughts like “I wish I wasn’t here” but can become more overt and dangerous
Increased alcohol and drug use
Aggressive behavior
Social withdrawal from friends, family and the community
Dramatic mood swings
Talking, writing or thinking about death
Impulsive or reckless behavior
Is There Imminent Danger?

Any person exhibiting these behaviors should get care immediately:

Putting their affairs in order and giving away their possessions
Saying goodbye to friends and family
Mood shifts from despair to calm
Planning, possibly by looking around to buy, steal or borrow the tools they need to commit suicide, such as a firearm or prescription medication
If you are unsure, a licensed mental health professional can help assess risk.

Risk Factors For Suicide

Research has found that about 90% of individuals who die by suicide experience mental illness. A number of other things may put a person at risk of suicide, including:

A family history of suicide.
Substance abuse. Drugs and alcohol can result in mental highs and lows that exacerbate suicidal thoughts.
Intoxication. More than one in three people who die from suicide are found to be currently under the influence.
Access to firearms.
A serious or chronic medical illness.
Gender. Although more women than men attempt suicide, men are four times more likely to die by suicide.
A history of trauma or abuse.
Prolonged stress.
Isolation.
Age. People under age 24 or above age 65 are at a higher risk for suicide.
A recent tragedy or loss.
Agitation and sleep deprivation.
Can Thoughts Of Suicide Be Prevented?

Mental health professionals here are PHR are trained to help you or someone you might know understand their feelings and can improve mental wellness and resiliency. If you or someone you know wants support and help please contact us at 540-772-5140

Crisis And Information Resources

National Suicide Hotline 1-800-273 TALK (8255)
Connect 540-981-8181 or 1-800-284-8898
Respond 540-776-1100 or 1-800-591-9992

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

World Heart Day

World Heart Day on September 29

World Heart Day is part of a campaign to spread awareness about heart disease and stroke prevention. The World Heart Federation have found that heart disease and strokes are the world’s leading cause of death, killing 17.1 million people every year – that’s more than victims of cancer, HIV and AIDS and malaria.

This is the perfect day to quit smoking, get exercising and start eating healthy – all in the name of keeping your ticker in good working order, and improving the health and well being of people the world over

This World Heart Day, focus on fueling your heart and power your life. Your heart is at the heart of your health.

Just a few simple steps;
- eat more healthily
- cut down on alcohol
- stop smoking
- increase your exercise (20 minutes a day to walk)

The aim is to improve health globally by encouraging people to make lifestyle changes and promoting education about ways to be good to your heart. This lesson is becoming increasingly relevant as reports of obesity, poor diet and physical inactivity in children and young people become more and more common.

Events take place to promote healthy hearts. Charities and other organisations coordinate walks and runs, health checks, public talks, shows and exhibitions to name a few of the interesting and informative events which mark the day. So on Heart Day, get involved, eat your fruit and veg and get outside; both you and your heart will feel the benefits.

If you want more information on World Heart Day or want to get more involved please go to the following websites.

http://www.world-heart-federation.org/index.php?id=123
http://worldheartday.org/

Take care of your HEART!!!!

Thursday, September 15, 2016

Volunteering "Helping others, Helping ourselves"

There has been some recent research demonstrating that volunteerism can help improve your health. There is evidence stating that helping out in a charitable way can improve your health from improving your blood pressure to extending your life. There was a study that demonstrated that older adults who volunteered fro at least 200 hours per year had improved their blood pressure, levels physical activity and psychological well being. Volunteering can get people out and about, gets you to be mobile, mentally stimulated, engaged in their community and be more social. Research shows links between a lack of social interaction and increased risk of dementia.

Research does warn that there is such thing as too much of a good thing. Ideally it is better to do up to 10 hours month for optimal benefits, based on research funding.

Over the years, they've identified five primary motivations for volunteering:
Values. Volunteering to satisfy personal values or humanitarian concerns. For some people this can have a religious component.
Community concern. Volunteering to help a particular community, such as a neighborhood or ethnic group, to which you feel attached.
Esteem enhancement. Volunteering to feel better about yourself or escape other pressures.
Understanding. Volunteering to gain a better understanding of other people, cultures or places.
Personal development. Volunteering to challenge yourself, meet new people and make new friends, or further your career.

For more information about the research of volunteering, go to http://www.apa.org/monitor/dec06/helping.aspx

What will motivate you to volunteer? What are you interested in?


There are many ways and avenues in the area of Roanoke and surrounding area to volunteer. Talk to your counselor and find out what will move you!

Saturday, August 13, 2016

Providing Support to LGBTQA plus Individuals

It is important for us to learn how to better support our Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer/Questioning, Asexual/ Ally, plus, peers, family, friends, and colleagues. This is an all too often oppressed group. Check out the link below to learn more about what you can do to help! http://www.glsen.org/ If you identify as LGBTQA Plus and are experiencing social and/or mental health challenges, call Psychological Health Roanoke at 540-772-5140 to schedule an appointment with a skilled and compassionate licensed clinician.